Don’t “Write” Yourself Off: I Don’t Care How Old You Are!

My thoughts exactly.

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26 thoughts on “Don’t “Write” Yourself Off: I Don’t Care How Old You Are!

  1. Well I took up classical singing lessons at 60. I’m 63 next month and have sung solo twice: Mozart in Italian and Canteloube in Langue d’Oc. It’s not over till it’s over and who knows what skills we might need beyond the grave? 🙂

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    • Thank you, Annisik, for that encouraging comment. I think that’s great. My daughter is in ther 30’s and is an actor and writer. She encouraged me to start writing. I’m 72 and just love it. I’ve always wanted to write, but just never got started. When people think it’s too late for them to start some art form, I think of the famous painter, Grandma Moses, who didn’t start painting until her late 70’s. She lived to the age of 100 and bacame quite famous for her paintings. You’re quite right. “It’s not over till it’s over.”

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      • In most ways, I see it as an advantage to be older and I would not have had the courage or maturity to undertake some of the stuff I get up to today! I applaud you. 🙂

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      • Thanks Ann. I applaud all those who decide to use their talents no matter how old they are. Besides, people are living longer today. With age comes experience that enriches us. With the extra time we have after retirement, if we’ve worked a day job, we can devote more time to using our talents to enrich others and ourselves.

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      • It can also be health problem related. For example, people with heart and/or lung problems get less oxygen to their brains which affects all mental functions including memory. Smoking is one of the greatest damagers in that respect. So is sitting still. The more you move, the power O2 goes through your system. You think better. It’s fascinating.

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      • Thank you, Cate, for that information. It’s indeed fascinating. I’ve never smoked, but my parents and grandmother did for years. I probably suffered some damage from second-hand smoke. I’ve had respitory problems my whole life. I had severe earaches as a child. People didn’t know about the dangers of second-hand smoke years ago. My grandmother suffered from chronic bronchitis. She finally gave up smoking at a late date. It was amazing she lived to almost 93. My parents stopped smoking when the grandchildren came along. Even then, my dad lived to almost 83 and my mom to almost 93. She claimed she never inhaled. She developed Alzheimer’s, but I don’t know that it’s related to smoking in any way. Half the time, Dad’s cigar was unlit. My husband is a non-smoker, and thank goodness neither of our children smoke. I have arthritis and sciatica, but have to start getting more exercise regardless.

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      • The public clubs and bars here banned all smoking due to the dangers of second hand smoke. I think we are becoming more aware. I am not sure about the Alzheimer’s link… you never know.

        Take very good care of yourself.

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      • Pleased to hear it. My printer is sick. I shoved a paper coffee filter into it and it didn’t come out the other end. I’ll have to explain to the technician why I did that when he comes to fix it. Will he understand that it was in the name of art? No doubt he’ll go back to his office with, “You won’t believe what this old dame tried to feed through her printer …” 🙂

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  2. I think I read somewhere the same thing you saw on TV. I’m sure there’s still a lot still to be discovered. I’ve always had the type of memory where some facts disappear and then come back. I’ve been used to it for years. My mother had Alzheimer’s so I know that when I see it, and that’s not the kind of memory problem I have, so I’m thankful. We’re individuals and our minds all work differently. We experience that with the over 100 different stories on Friday Fictioneers every week. I thnk that’s marvelous. Now, at my age, I just make notes and that works well.

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