DON’T WORRY

 

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Copyright–Madison Woods

 

Here we are again to show our creativity by writing original stories for the Friday Fictioneers weekly challenge. This challenge is to write a story with no more than 100 words. It’s supposed to include a beginning, middle, end, and follow the picture prompt supplied for the week. The talented author and artist, Rochelle Wisoff-Fields, is the gracious hostess for this challenge.  This week she’s visiting family, so a prompt from a couple of years ago is being reused. The prompt had been supplied by the previous hostess, Madison Woods. Thanks again, Madison. Have a good trip, Rochelle. The link to Friday Fictioneers is as follows:

http://rochellewisofffields.wordpress.com/2014/08/27/29-august-2014/

Genre:  Humor Fiction

Word Count:  100 Words

DON’T WORRY By P.S. Joshi

Julia Warren slogged the whole day cleaning  for her bridge party the next afternoon.

Tommy ran in to show his mom the bag. “Look at all this candy. This is better than last Halloween. What a haul.”

“Listen Tommy,” she threatened,” don’t overdo. Remember last year.”

He looked at her in disgust. “Hey Mom, I’m ten now. Don’t you think I know better than to overeat?” He raced to his room.

Two hours later, Tom Warren found his wife scrubbing at the hall carpet. “Dare I ask?”

“Tommy didn’t make it to the bathroom,” she mumbled through tears and anger

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Tipsday: Writerly Goodness found on the interwebz, Aug 17-23, 2014

This blog contains a wealth of helpful websights.

Writerly Goodness

I really tried to get used to the new WordPress editor, but I finally had to give in and activate Classic Mode (Dum-ta-de-dah!). It’s so much easier to apply tags in the classic editor.

Let’s start with some publishing news. From Publishers Weekly, no less. What copyright changes mean for Canadian publishers.

Here’s K.M. Weiland’s weekly podcast/post: Can a character’s arc be a subplot?

Here’s her guest post on the Writer’s Alley on what weather can do for your story.

Then Katie wandered over to the Wordserve Water Cooler to discuss how to make a walk-on character memorable (but not too memorable).

Here’s Katie’s workshops & webinars page if you want to get moar of the good stuff.

And her weekly vlog on how to tighten your tale by streamlining your symbolism.

Anne R. Allen rounds up the usual suspects for her post on five protagonists…

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PARKIN’ SPACE

parked

Copyright–Roger Bultot

Here we are once again to show our creativity by writing original stories for the Friday Fictioneers’ weekly challenge. This challenge is to write a story with no more than 100 words. It’s supposed to include a beginning, middle, end, and follow the picture prompt supplied for the week. The gracious and talented author and artist, Rochelle Wisoff-Fields, is the hostess for the challenge. The prompt this week was supplied by Roger Bultot. Thanks Roger.

For those interested in publishing their short stories, I found a great blog post with helpful information and links. The major link is as follows:

http://writerunboxed.com/2014/08/10/how-to-get-your-short-stories-published-in-lit-mags/

The link to Friday Fictioneers and all the other stories is as follows:

http://rochellewisofffields.wordpress.com/2014/08/22-august-2014/

Genre:  Humor Fiction

Word Count:  100 Words

PARKIN’ SPACE  By P.S. Joshi

Matt sauntered out of the big truck stop hotel on Route 98. He spotted a crowd standing in the parking lot around his 18-wheeler.

Someone was laughing,  hard. When he pushed his way through, there was his brother John, his shoulders shaking and head thrown back. Then he noticed the truck. Vines and other growth were wound all around the front grill, trailing under the bumper, and out onto the pavement for about five feet.

“Well Matt,” John said, tears streaming down his face, “I guess that’s the last damn time you’ll argue with a landscaper about a parkin’ space.

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Losing Robin Williams—The Dark Side of Those Who Make Us Laugh

This is a great blog and a great post.

Kristen Lamb's Blog

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Suicide. It’s a topic that’s been on most of our minds as of late. I was BROKEN when I found out about Robin Williams. It’s like this bright shining star just snuffed out, leaving only a black hole of crushing emptiness behind. I feel terrible for taking him for granted, selfishly assuming he’d always be around.

I haven’t yet cried because I’m afraid I might not stop. My fondest childhood memories involve Mork & Mindy. Growing up, I’d watch Williams’ comedic acts over and over and over, studying his timing and how he could do what he did, because to me? It was MAGIC. In fact, I can honestly say he was my earliest mentor. I learned to laugh and make others laugh, and, since home and school were living nightmares, laughter was my lifeline.

I’m no expert aside from having suicide issues in the family. Also, years ago, I…

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Lesson 1095 – Extra life – Save a life, name a chicken

This is such a worthy cause.

Lessons Learned from the Flock

spencer-santa-2012 This has nothing to do with this post other than to show you what a good kid Spencer is.

My son, Spencer, has decided to join an online effort to raise money through Extra Life for the Children’s Miracle Network to go toward children’s medical treatment.

This is how Extra Life began:

Extra Life began in 2008 as a way of honoring a young lady named Victoria Enmon. Tori’s battle against acute lymphoblastic leukemia inspired the Sarcastic Gamer Community in a way that is difficult to describe. Members sent in video games and bought gifts to keep Tori’s spirits up despite numerous hospital stays and three bouts with the deadly disease.

“Tragically, we lost Tori to cancer in January 2008. Later that year, I asked my partners at Sarcastic Gamer if they would be interested in Extra Life, a 24-hour video game marathon to raise money for the hospital…

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THE QUILL

 

antique-desk

Copyright:  Jan Wayne Fields

 

Here we are once more to show our creativity. Once again we’re asked to compose original stories for the Friday Fictioneers’ weekly challenge. This challenge is to write a story with no more than 100 words. It’s supposed to include a beginning, middle, end, and follow the picture prompt supplied for the week. The gracious and talented author and artist, Rochelle Wisoff-Fields is the host for the challenge. The prompt this week was supplied by Rochelle’s husband. Jan Wayne Fields. Thanks Jan.

http://rochellewisofffields.wordpress.com/2014/08/13/15-august-2014/

Genre:  Horror Fiction

Word Count:  100 Words

THE QUILL By P.S. Joshi

People laughed at Connie still writing with a quill. She’d found it in the drawer of her great-great grandfather’s desk, behind a secret panel. It still looked brand new despite its age.

Connie had heard numerous rumors about this ancestor, all  unpleasant.  People had feared him in his lifetime. No one now knew  why, but the fear had spread. One faithful servant was paid well to keep secrets.

People often saw the ancestor by a window, happily writing.

Connie sat and took out ancient, yellowed parchment she’d found and began to write.

“Who dies now?” the quill wrote in blood.

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LOST

 

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Copyright — Bjorn Rudberg

Here we are again with a chance to show our creativity by composing and writing original stories for the Friday Fictioneers weekly challenge. This challenge is to write a story with no more than 100 words. It’s to include a beginning, middle, end, and follow the picture prompt supplied for that week. The gracious and talented hostess for the challenge is author and artist Rochelle Wisoff-Fields. The prompt this week was supplied by Bjorn Rudberg. Thanks Bjorn.

http://rochellewisofffields.wordpress.com/2014/08/06/8-august-2014/

Genre:  Horror Fiction

Word Count:  100 Words

LOST By P.S. Joshi

I wound through the Sierra Madres, alone and lost. Turning the bend, I spotted a large house with no visible lights on inside. It was perched on the slope.

Desperation clawed at my insides. It was dusk, a bad time to lose my way.

 Parked, I grabbed my flashlight, crunched up the gravel walk, and climbed the porch steps. Banging on the door, I waited.

The inside latch unfastened, and the door creaked open a crack. A hand with putrid, rotting flesh slid into view. Trembling all over, I stumbled to the car and somehow drove to a nearby town.

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