THE READER

 

bike_detour_at_library_randy_mazie

Copyright — Randy Mazie

Here we are gathered together for another week. This time we’re in the comfortable virtual conference room of a large modern library. We’re here once more to discuss our original stories for Friday Fictioneers. Our talented and gracious hostess for the gathering is author and artist Rochelle Wisoff-Fields. The weekly challenge is to write a story with no more than 100 words.  It’s supposed to have a beginning, middle, end, and follow the picture prompt for the week. This week’s prompt was supplied by Randy Mazie. Thanks Randy.

I also want to wish a Happy Thanksgiving to all who’ll celebrate that day this week!

The link for all other stories is as follows:

http://rochellewisofffields.wordpress.com/2014/11/26/28-november-2014/

Genre:  Nonfiction Memoir

Word Count:  100 Words

THE READER by P.S. Joshi

There were many readers in Dad’s family, including Dad and his parents of course. But the person I remember most for reading was Grandma’s sister, Aunt Gert.

Her eyesight had been poor for years. Dad said when young, she’d stand stirring food on the stove and reading at the same time.

I remember her in her seventies and eighties sitting in the front room of her home, thick glasses on, large magnifying glass held over the print of a book, head bent, reading by the hour.

Her younger son had subscribed to the Book of the Month Club for her.

friday-fictioneers

#Authors #Bloggers #Readers – Be aware of Intellectual Property Theft Laws!

This information is vital!

Chris The Story Reading Ape's Blog

Intellectual Property Theft – a growing problem that hurts everyone in this writing business

By Susan M. Toy

Recently, I’ve become aware of the increasing amount of Intellectual Property (IP) theft that’s taking place online. It’s been happening for a long time: artists—visual, photographers, musicians and writers—seem only able to stand by and watch as what they have created is either copied and pasted elsewhere on the net without permission or no attribution at all is given for their work. Yes, there are copyright laws in place to protect us and the illegal use of our IP. But internet users seem unaware of these laws, or blatantly flout them, or truly believe that, whatever is on the Internet is free for their own personal use and by anyone who wants to copy and paste it into their status update or to their blog.

I’m going to speak specifically to the…

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THE GARAGE

 

claire-fuller-7 Garage

Copy–Claire Fuller

 

Here we are another week gathered together this time in a virtual cafe across from a small town garage. We’re together once more to discuss our original stories for the Friday Fictioneer’s challenge. Our talented and gracious hostess for this gathering is the author and artist Rochelle Wisoff-Fields. The weekly challenge is to write a story with no more than 100 words. It’s supposed to have a beginning, middle, end, and follow the picture prompt for the week. This week’s prompt was supplied by Claire Fuller. Thanks Claire.

The link for all other stories is as follows:

http://rochellewisofffields.wordpress.com/2014/11/19/21-november-2014/

Genre:  Realistic Fiction

Word Count:  100 Words

THE GARAGE By P.S. Joshi

It’s still sitting there closed up. Maybe someday I’ll sell it. It was left to me in the Will so I’ll have to decide. Right now I hurt too much to think about it.

My brother John and his wife set out that sunny day last June on a planned picnic to celebrate their first wedding anniversary. There was little money to celebrate in a grand style.

They only got as far as Fenton’s Hill. A speeder came up over the hill at 90 mph and lost control.

I closed up the garage and it sits there. I’m still hurting.

friday-fictioneers

Calling all Minions!

Good short reads while waiting in the doctor’s office, on subway, etc.

Adam Ickes

Calling All Minions, Flash Fiction Fanatics, Monsters, Freaks, Horror Hounds, Misfits, Hobbits, Trolls, Ne’er-Do-Wellers, Thieves, Witches, Demons, Timeless Evils, Grossly Incompetent Robots, Monkeys of All Shapes and Varieties, One Penguin Named Carl McFlappins the Third, A Handful of Impish Gnomes, Two Pickles, A Basket of Ham Sandwiches, A Very Large Blue Ox who Roams Around With a Guy Named Paul, and You.

How are you all doing today, my wonderful minions?

Have I mentioned how amazing you look? Top notch, I must say. Did you get a haircut? It looks fabulous.

Ok, ok, you caught me. I’ll stop sucking up now, even though you are awesome. Really. You are.

I need you. Yes, you. No, no, not the one in the back with his/her finger in his/her nose. On second thought: yeah, I’ll take you too. The more the merrier.

Let’s just get right to the heart of the matter…

Wicked…

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UNFORGETABLE

 

Street in California

Copyright–Rochelle Wisoff-Fields

 

Here we are again. We’ve gathered at the tables of a virtual sidewalk cafe in Hollywood. We’re here in the movie capital of the U.S. to discuss our original stories for another week. Our hostess for this weekly event is the talented and gracious author and artist Rochelle Wisoff-Fields. This is the coming together of the Friday Fictioneer’s group. The challenge is to each write a story with no more than 100 words. It’s supposed to include a beginning, middle, end, and follow the picture prompt for the week. The prompt this week was supplied by our hostess herself, Rochelle Wisoff-Fields. Thanks again Rochelle.

The link for all the other stories is as follows:

http://rochellewisofffields.workpress.com/2014/11/12/14-november-2014/

Genre:  Humor Fiction

Word Count:  100 Words

UNFORGETABLE By P.S. Joshi

Mamie Brunfield had been a big, big movie and TV star in the 1950’s. Now in her 80’s, with a great memory, she was going to write her memoir. She had known many men intimately and worked with many stars still alive. Fear in Hollywood was living and breathing.

She hired a ghost writer to come to her spacious mansion perched in the Hollywood hills.

Earnest Dithing was seriously thinking of suing Mamie for slander.

“What did I ever see in the old goat?” he asked his young, shapely blond wife.

“Will I lose my bee-oo-ti-ful diamonds Ernie-wernie?” she whimpered.

friday-fictioneers

Guest Post: Writers’ Critique Groups by D. Wallace Peach

This is helpful information on critique groups.

Nicholas C. Rossis

From the blog of Nicholas C. Rossis, author of science fiction, the Pearseus epic fantasy series and children's booksI first came across D. Wallace Peach on Bookvetter; her fantasy novel Sunwielder was one of several suggested to me. It joined my tbr list and climbed steadily until I read it. That was a few months ago, and still find it twirling in my head.

Peach has created not just a great fantasy world, but also one of the best books I’ve read this year, so be sure to check out her “ask and ye shall receive” giveaway! It couldn’t be simpler: just leave a comment on her website saying which book you’d like to receive. The first twenty visitors will get a free copy in their email!

One of the best things of our era is the ease with which we can get in touch with our favourite authors. I contacted her to let her know how much I enjoyed her book, and she agreed to a guest post…

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A Simple Guide to Deep PoV

Good and useful information.

Nicholas C. Rossis

From the blog of Nicholas C. Rossis, author of science fiction, the Pearseus epic fantasy series and children's booksPoint of View (PoV) is a fascinating thing. It allows us to play god in the little universe we have created for ourselves (and, hopefully, our readers). And, like a zoom-in function, allows us to zoom in and out of our characters. We can either watch them from afar or listen in to their most intimate thoughts.

First, third, omniscient…

You are probably aware of the three main PoV used in most fiction: first-person, third-person and third-person omniscient, but here is a quick recap:

First-person uses, well, the first person: “He stared lovingly into her almond eyes. I love you, I wanted to tell her. She seemed unnerved.”

Third-person, imaginatively enough, uses the third person: “He stared lovingly into her almond eyes. I love you, he wanted to tell her. She seemed unnerved.”

Third-person omniscient resembles closely the former, but allows us to jump from one character to…

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TRANSFORMATION

 

Parked Edsels

 Copyright — Jean L. Hays

Here we are this week gathered in a virtual small-town parking lot. We’re  sitting on folding chairs under an awning–it’s a warm day for November. We’ve gathered here to discuss our original stories for the week. This is the Friday Fictioneer’s weekly challenge. Our gracious and talented hostess Rochelle Wisoff-Fields has called us to meet. The challenge is to each write a story with no more than 100 words. It’s supposed to include a beginning, middle, end, and follow the picture prompt for the week. The prompt this week was supplied by Jean L Hays. Thanks Jean.

The link for all the other stories is as follows:

http://rochellewisofffields.wordpress.com/2014/11/05/7-november-2014/

 Genre:  Humor Fiction

Word Count:  100 Words

TRANSFORMATION By P.S. Joshi

Two Edsels were parked in the city lot of the small town of Dingley, North Carolina.

“Hey hon,” said the rose-colored Edsel to her neighbor. “What the heck did they do to you?”

“Well,” said the marigold-and-white Edsel, “my owner decided to go into the snow- plow and ditch-digging business. He said there was no sense leavin’ me just sit around and turn into a rust bucket. He might as well make use of me since he couldn’t resell me.”

“How’s it goin’?” asked Rose.

“Oh, it’s alright,” said Marigold,”but I’m no longer a glamour girl.”

friday-fictioneers

The Three “Acts” of a Writer’s Journey—From Newbie to Master

This is helpful information.

Kristen Lamb's Blog

Pirate Code=Writing Rules. Clearer now? :) Pirate Code=Writing Rules. Clearer now? 🙂

The mark of a great storyteller is they make our job look easy. The story flows, pulls us in, and appears seamless. Many of us decided to become writers because we grew up loving books. Because good storytellers are masters of what they do, we can easily fall into a misguided notion that “writing is easy.” Granted there are a rare few exceptions, but most of us will go through three acts (stages) in this career if we stick it through.

Act One—The Neophyte

This is when we are brand new. We’ve never read a craft book and the words flow. We never run out of words to put on a page because we are like a kid banging away on a piano having fun and making up “music.” We aren’t held back or hindered by any structure or rules and we have amazing…

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