…great Part Two of a Double helping of Guest Blogs from Authoress, Clodagh Phelan…

Great writing information!

Seumas Gallacher

clodagh

…what a buzz, to end 2014 with not one, but two, helpings of Guest Postings from the same pal, Authoress, Clodagh PhelanPart One was a fascinating account of how she put together her novel, THE EIGHTEENTH OF NOVEMBER, … Part Two of her blogs below is a goldmine for all we quill-scrapers, long-time hacks and neophytes alike… yeez need to know ‘stuff’ about our scribbling ’business’?… have a decko there :

…thanks, again, m’Lady, Clodagh...

CRAFT OR CALLING?

Snoopy2

When I first started writing, I simply wrote. I wrote in every form except the novel. Too long. Too difficult. Not for me. Or so I thought. Until I tried it and found it was a perfect fit. Typical! I discovered how to write by writing and by copying what my favourite authors did. Later, when I began to write novels, I also read some wise, practical ‘how-to’…

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DON FRANCISCO

 

The Spanish hacienda

This is my contribution to Monday’s Finish the Story for this week. Every Monday a new picture prompt is given along with the first sentence to be used for the story. The story is to be written with only 100 to 150 additional words. I’ve bolded the first sentence given with the picture prompt.

The link for all other stories is as follows:

http://mondaysfinishthestory.wordpress.com/2014/12/29/mondays-finish-the-story-december-29th-2014/

Genre:  Speculative Fiction

Word Count:  150+13+2=165 Words

DON FRANCISCO By P.S. Joshi

The house of Don Francisco sat in a remote part of the desert. It had been part of the large estate of the Don, a land grant from the crown in Spain in the 1600’s to his great grandfather, a conquistador or Spanish conqueror.

Don Francisco had an administrator and the estate prospered although no one knew how. No one knew the evil that visited there.

It was far from the closest town, and there were no herds of cattle. No cattle could have survived on that arid land. Nothing would grow. His children and administrator knew the secret, but no one else.

Once night was heard, “No-o-o-o, ah-y-e-e-e.” Wham. Crunch. In the morning, Don Francisco’s body was found torn apart, blood  everywhere. His children quietly buried him in the desert and sold the property, traveling to Spain where they had relatives. The buyer was never disclosed, and the property stood empty until it fell to ruin. No one would go near.

Symbol for Monday's Finish the Story

FROM ABOVE

93-12-december-28th-2014

 

This is my contribution to Sunday Photo Fiction on December 28, 2014. Every Sunday a new picture prompt is given. The weekly challenge is to write an original story with no more than 200 words. It’s supposed to have a beginning, middle, end, and follow the picture prompt for the week.

The link for all other stories is as follows:

http://sundayphotofictioner.wordpress.com/2014/12/28/sunday-photo-fiction-december-28th-2014/

Genre:  Realistic Fiction

Word Count:  194 Words

FROM ABOVE By P.S. Joshi

Mrs. Billit had just celebrated her 93rd birthday. She was a small, frail woman, and her life soon after started to slip away. She was doing her best to hang on until July 4th.

“Millie,” she said to her caregiver on the big night, “I don’t want to miss the fireworks.”  She pointed a long, slender finger, “Please move my wheelchair in front of the picture window in the living room before they start.”

After she’d had her dinner, Millie moved her and they waited. Just after dark, when the fireworks began at the city park, the elderly woman murmured, “Oh, how wonderful. I used to watch these with my husband. When the children came, we all watched them together. We drove to the park in those days. We had to start early to find a good spot in both the parking lot and on the lawn. I’m so glad I can now see them from the house.

Just before the end of the spectacle, Millie saw the little body slump forward. As she later told the son, a tear running down her cheek, “Your mother enjoyed the last of the fireworks from above.”

Sunday Photo Fiction Image

SIR RODERICK RETURNS

 

Steps down wall

Copyright–Bjorn Rudberg

Here we are once again, gathered this week in a virtual ruined castle with our gracious and talented hostess and guide, Rochelle Wisoff-Fields. It’s December, but there’s rumored to be a ghost who returns here only in the Christmas season, and we hope to catch a glimpse of him. We’re wearing our winter coats to keep warm. We’re also here to discuss our original stories for the week. This is the Friday Fictioneers group, and the challenge is for each of us to write a story with no more than 100 words. It’s supposed to have a beginning, middle, end, and follow the picture prompt for the week. This week’s prompt was supplied by Bjorn Rudberg. Thanks again Bjorn. We’ve just spotted the ghost, and Sir Roderick and I both wish all of you a Happy Holiday Season!

The link for all the other stories is as follows:

http://rochellewisofffields.wordpress.com/2014/12/24/26-december-2014/

Genre:  Speculative Fiction

Word Count:  100 Words

SIR RODERICK RETURNS By P.S. Joshi

It was Christmas Day in the year 1614. All the knights at the castle had feasted after the long pre-Christmas fast.

Sir Roderick felt chest pains. “Probably overate,” he thought as he drifted off to sleep.

He awoke refreshed, but met with a strange sight. Half the roof was gone, and he was sitting alone on the banquet hall floor. All furnishings were missing.

He arose and walked into the courtyard. It was overgrown with weeds. He walked to the steps down the wall. They were also covered with growth.

He would eventually learn his spirit had returned in 2014.

friday-fictioneers

FAREWELL FRIENDS

 

2014-12-22-bw-beacham

This is my contribution to Monday’s Finish the Story for this week. Every Monday a new picture prompt is given by Barbara Beacham along with the first sentence to be used for the story. The story is to be written with only 100-150 additional words. I’ve bolded the first sentence given with the picture prompt.

The link for all other stories is as follows”

http://mondaysfinishthestory.wordpress.com/2014/12/22/mondays-finish-the-story-december-22nd-2014/

Genre:  Realistic Fiction

Word Count:  145 Words

FAREWELL FRIENDS By P.S. Joshi

As the year wound down to a close, they gathered around the table and raised their glasses.

They’d met at the local business club. “To friendship,” they toasted. Pals since high school, every ten years they went to Central High reunions. Yearly they got together to toast their long-standing friendship. Christmas cards were exchanged.

They spoke of children. Only Jill and Frank were childless by choice.

Brad hated to admit it, but everyone knew he was an alcoholic. His wife, Grace, had no control over his addiction.

They all ate and drank their fill. All had to drive home, and there were no designated drivers. About 11 p.m. they went to the parking lot. “Farewell,” they shouted and climbed into their cars. Henry and Ellie were last to pull out.

There was a sharp curve about three miles from the club. The next morning, large headlines read, “Accident at Miller’s Hill. Mrs. Ellie Edmundson pronounced DOA. Henry Edmundson is in critical condition..”

Symbol for Monday's Finish the Story

STRIKE

 

92-12-december-21st-2014

This is my contribution to Sunday Photo Fiction for December 21, 2014. Every Sunday a new picture prompt is given. The weekly challenge is to write an original story with no more than  200 words. It’s supposed to have a beginning, middle, end, and follow the picture prompt for the week.

The link for all other stories is as follows:

http://sundayphotofictioner.wordpress.com/2014/12/21/sunday-photo-fiction-december-21st-2014/

Genre:  Humor Fiction

Word Count:  200 Words

STRIKE By P.S.  Joshi

All was not well at Santa’s workshop high in the town of Mountainous. Most people think the workshop and village sit right at the North Pole, but that’s a myth. For security reasons, it’s high in the mountains of Alaska and well-fortified.

The elves had done something strange; they’d gone on strike. These were a new breed of elf, different from their forefathers. They demanded more than minimum wage. They also wanted free food service, shorter hours, and longer breaks. Housing and free education for their children weren’t enough anymore.

Head elf said, “We dedicate our lives to serving Santa. It’s only fair we have our demands met.” They’d used an elf gorilla tactic and waited until December.

Santa lost his temper for the first time in over two hundred years. It did no good. The elves stood firm. Their lawyer said, “We’ll take it to the Supreme Court. It will make the TV news, and there’ll be a scandal.”

Mrs. Claus was worried. Santa was losing weight. It would spoil his public image. She hadn’t heard a “Ho, ho” in days. She convinced him to sit down at the negotiating table.

Santa finally gave in to the terms.

Sunday Photo Fiction Image

The Forgotten Ones

Something that needs to be known.

Lockie's Lectern

rainy window

I heard a story the other day that touched me to my core, and I thought I would share it here. A lady was talking about her son who was in the local hospital. Her son didn’t have a broken leg, or a bad appendix. Her son had a mental health issue, and he was admitted to get his medications reevaluated.

In our local hospital there is a special psychiatric ward, which is a locked down section of the hospital, and security needs to be in place as some of the patients are or can be violent. Some patients have tried to commit suicide, or are very depressed. Whatever the mental illnesses or issues, this ward has very different tools for patient care. One of those tools is a pool table and a ping pong table. There is also a PlayStation 3 and one or two games. What the ward…

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HOW to get promotion for yourself and your book …

Great information. This is something to take seriously.

Books: Publishing, Reading, Writing

Two days ago I wrote a blog post that proved to be the most popular, in terms of reach and reaction, of any I’ve ever written! Thanks to everyone who read, liked, shared, reblogged, followed my blog, and commented on it. I guess I hit a nerve with the topic of authors behaving badly and how to avoid becoming one. It seems this kind of behaviour is definitely prevalent and a problem on social media, because so many of you agreed with me and my guests who also offered quotes on experiences they’d had dealing with these self-centred authors.

I took a negative tact on that last post, because it’s a fun angle to come from with this kind of list, and I’ve had success with that approach in the past. It also allows me to write in a humorous and sarcastic voice – which I hope was the voice…

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TRAPPED

 

cropped-bugs

Copyright–Douglas M. Macilroy

Here we are this week, gathered in the virtual insect house of the town zoo. This was Doug Macilroy’s idea. The spiders have just been fed. Good thing we’ve already eaten lunch. We’re here to discuss our original stories for Friday Fictioneers. Our gracious and talented hostess for this gathering is author and artist Rochelle Wisoff-Fields. The weekly challenge for this group is to write a story with no more than 100 words. It’s supposed to have a beginning, middle, end, and follow the picture prompt for the week. This week’s prompt was supplied by Douglas M. Macilroy. Thanks again Doug. Happy Holidays to all!

The link for all other stories is as follows:

http://rochellewisofffields.wordpress.com/2014/12/17/19-december-2014/

Genre:  Realistic Fiction

Word Count:  100 Words

TRAPPED By P.S. Joshi

Beth felt trapped. When she married him, Greg was sweet. His parents expected a lot from him, and he made them proud. He strived and became successful.

Added duties of his company job in Client Relations meant entertaining new clients. This included cocktail parties.

Beth found alcohol made him mean. Physical abuse to her, savage slaps and punches, began and escalated. Injured, she worried about their two children. Her parents were scared as well.

Finally, a concerned friend suggested she and the children go to a shelter. Trembling, she rapidly packed one afternoon, and her friend took them to safety.

friday-fictioneers

Why Are Certain Stories Timeless? What Scrooge Can Teach Us About Great Writing

A very special post.

Kristen Lamb's Blog

Screen Shot 2012-12-24 at 9.22.47 AM

One of my all-time favorite movies for the holidays is The Muppets Christmas Carol. I believe I’ve seen this movie a few hundred thousand times. I’ve worn out three VHS tapes and at least three DVDs. I play the movie over and over, mainly because, well, duh,  MUPPETS! I drive my husband nuts playing this movie over and over…and over.

I’m worse than a three-year-old.

Muppets aside, I also can’t get enough of the music. I love the story of A Christmas Carol no matter how many times I see it, no matter how many renditions, and I am certainly not alone. Charles Dickens’ story of a redeemed miser is a staple for holiday celebrations around the world and across the generations.

This story is virtually synonymous with “Christmas,” but why is it such a powerful story? Why has it spoken so deeply to so many? Why is it…

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