The Forgotten Ones

Something that needs to be known.

Lockie's Lectern

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I heard a story the other day that touched me to my core, and I thought I would share it here. A lady was talking about her son who was in the local hospital. Her son didn’t have a broken leg, or a bad appendix. Her son had a mental health issue, and he was admitted to get his medications reevaluated.

In our local hospital there is a special psychiatric ward, which is a locked down section of the hospital, and security needs to be in place as some of the patients are or can be violent. Some patients have tried to commit suicide, or are very depressed. Whatever the mental illnesses or issues, this ward has very different tools for patient care. One of those tools is a pool table and a ping pong table. There is also a PlayStation 3 and one or two games. What the ward…

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5 thoughts on “The Forgotten Ones

  1. Thank you P.S. How nice of you to share with your friends, readers and followers. Much appreciated. I hope that if just one person reading will act and donate to their hospital psych. wing, then it will all be worth it. I was told when the nurse gave a young homeless woman who was on the ward a donated tooth brush, she burst out crying, overwhelmed by the kindness an unknown stranger had shown.

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    • You’re very welcome Lockie. I had no idea this condition existed in the psych wards in U.S. hospitals. I guess this is one of the areas where hospitals are cutting back. Perhaps it’s always been that way. What a shame. People need to be educated to this need. Let’s hope word get out to a good many people. There are a great many kind-hearted people. They just need to know there’s a problem. You wrote an informative and lovely piece. — Suzanne

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      • Thanks for the kind words Suzanne. For the record, I don’t know what the state of the wards are in US Hospitals. I am talking about our hospital in my very poor province in Canada. Even though we have health care, which we pay for in the long run with high taxes, the free health care covers only the basics. It means if my wife is having a bad pregnancy we won’t owe our house to pay the bill at the hospital, but I don’t think anyone knows about these special wards, because the patients there have no one, for the most part. My hope is folks will just make a call, see what they might need, and offer this kindness of giving a stranger a smile for 10 minutes while she washes her hair in real shampoo.

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      • I’m so sorry Lockie that I either didn’t notice or forgot that you were from Canada. I probably forgot. I have one of those memories where things come and go. The fact that the info comes back gives me hope. It isn’t age with me. My memory’s always been like that. Thanks so much for telling me about Canada’s health insurance. I’ve often wondered how that works. Obama now has begun something similar in the U.S. I haven’t investigated because I get Medicare. Before that when I was working in the U.S., our kids were younger, and my husband was doing consulting work where he didn’t get benefits, I used to have all of them on my company insurance. I used to kid that I didn’t worry about death because I didn’t think they’d let me die. My dad’s brother and his wife used to go to Canada almost every vacation they got. They loved it. Before I was born, my dad used to go camping and fishing in Canada. He was from Ohio, so it wasn’t a long distance to go. He used to drive to Niagara Falls and cross over at that entry point. 🙂 — Suzanne

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  2. Thank you for sharing this. When I read these pieces, I’m often saddened by the way our world ignores those without power, especially when the solution to so much suffering boils down to pennies and a little compassion. When we treat people like objects, things to be dealt with, stowed away, and often disposed of, we lose another sliver of our humanity, our innocence and hope for the future.

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