….Written Acts of Kindness Awards… m’Lud, David Prosser…

David is truly deserving of this award.

Seumas Gallacher

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…anyone who has ever had the pleasure of reading m’Lud, David Prosser’s Barsetshire Diaries blog pieces will understand the humanity of a man who always has encouraging WURDS for his pals and others on the internet…

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…the essence of ‘paying it forward’, David has been a constant, stalwart supporter of this blog and of so many others where I see his name on the message rosters… a worthy recipient of the Written Acts of Kindness Awards, his Lordship also entertains, amuses and delights with his journals on the goings-on in his household… watch out particularly for the ‘melt-yer-hearts’ photographs of his grandchildren… yeez can join me and a legion of those who enjoy the scribblings of a man who writes from the heart… his blog is easy to find:

https://barsetshirediaries.wordpress.com 

…m’Lud, David, the rules for passing this Award on are very simple:

  1. You are welcome to give it…

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Famous Writers’ Insults

Highly entertaining piece.

Nicholas C. Rossis

I often say that my favorite thing about my writing journey is how helpful everyone’s been. I’ve met some wonderful people, eager to support and encourage others.

That’s not always been the case, though. Indeed, when authors get mean, the results can be spectacular, as the infographic below by Amy Cowen, found at her AussieWriter blog, shows:From the blog of Nicholas C. Rossis, author of science fiction, the Pearseus epic fantasy series and children's books

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BANDSTAND MEMORIES

Park band shelter

Copyright: David Stewart

Here we are back for another week, gathered in a virtual park in a small town on an unusually warm day for late March. We’re here for another meeting of the Friday Fictioneers to discuss our original stories for the week. Our hostess for this gathering is the gracious and talented author and artist, Rochelle Wisoff-Fields. The challenge for this group is to write a story with no more than 100 words. It’s supposed to have a beginning, middle, end, and follow the picture prompt for the week. This week’s picture was supplied by David Stewart. Thanks, David. To read the other stories from group members, just follow the link provided below, and click on the little blue frog in the blue box.

The link for the other stories is as follows:

https://rochellewisofffields.wordpress.com/2015/03/25/27-march-2015/

Just a word extra–I recently, for a short time, had some of my Inbox mail going into Trash, if anyone wants to check their Trash as-well-as their Spam. I’ve also had it go into Spam in the past.

Genre: Humor Fiction

Word Count: 100 Words

BANDSTAND MEMORIES by P.S. Joshi

You know how you have these romantic memories about your youth? I had them until I went back for a visit to the town where I grew up.

The old park bandstand looked the same as when Rene Shimhalt and I walked there hand-in-hand, and I gave her her first kiss. At least, I thought so.

When talking to my best friend, Ernie, I found that not only he, but several other guys had beaten me to it.

Of course, that’s the past now since Rene and her husband, Bart, just celebrated their Tenth Wedding Anniversary and have three kids.

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Written  Act of Kindness Award

WILD RIVER

 

Rafting

Copyright: Barbara W. Beacham

This is my weekly contribution to Monday’s Finish the Story, hosted by Barbara Beacham. Every Monday, Barb supplies a new picture prompt along with the first sentence for the story. The original story to be written should have only 100 to 150 additional words. I’ve bolded the first sentence given with the picture prompt. After the link, click on the little blue frog in the blue box to read the other stories.

The link for all the other stories is as follows:

https://mondaysfinishthestory.wordpress.com/2015/03/23/mondays-finish-the-story-march-23rd-2015/

Genre: Realistic Fiction

Word Count: 2+18-150=170

WILD RIVER by P.S. Joshi

When the team heard the dam explode, they knew they had limited time to make it to safety.

It began as a great day for the rafting exploration of the upper Gambeze River people’s new settlement. The government of Bangara had relocated them fifteen years ago when the dam project was begun. There had been threats and trouble from factions that objected to the project.

The explosion had been planned and they had to work fast as the water thundered toward them.

Each tightened his grip on his paddle. The rush of water picked up the large reinforced, rubber boat like a huge hand and hurled it forward. It just missed the river rocks. The current now propelled them along at tremendous speed.

Their only chance was to reach the fork in the river where the force of the water would be divided and the speed would decrease.

It should be just ahead. Finally, there it was. Each pushed his paddle to the left and it was done.

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A Guest Post by Sarah Mallery

Really interesting piece.

barsetshirediaries

I’m treading new ground today and asking a friend to stand in for me and write a guest post. Sarah Mallery is a successful novelist who has other strings to her bow I’m sure she’d like to share, including the advent of a new book.

No more from me. Take it away Sarah.

Flash Fiction & The Joy of Counting Words

After I had written my short story collection, Sewing Can Be Dangerous and Other Small Threads, I happened on an article for writers that mentioned how by writing flash fiction, it is easier to get your work into a magazine. Longer stories take up more space and create more competition, they claimed. Space equals money. And competition. Now, what is this kind of fiction? I wondered. Well, according to Wikipedia, this is the definition:

Flash fiction is a style of fictional literature or fiction of extreme brevity.

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Guest Post by Charles E. Yallowitz: What I’ve Learned

A great interview.

Nicholas C. Rossis

You probably remember author Charles E. Yallowitz, who’s become a regular visitor to this blog and fast friend. He graciously agreed to a guest post on the things he has learned since self-publishing his first book of his Legends of Windemere series. Take it, Charles!

Stuff I’ve learned since publishing my first book

Beginning of a Hero (CLICK FOR AMAZON SITE) Beginning of a Hero (CLICK FOR AMAZON SITE) Cover Art by Jason Pedersen

So, Nicholas and I were talking a while back and I said something that caught his attention. It was a simple comment about stuff I learned since I published my first book of Legends of Windemere back in February of 2013.

I’m gearing up for the 7th book of the series, Sleeper of the Wildwood Fugue, and Nicholas suggested I write about what I’ve learned over the last two years — that happen to feel like a decade.

Though I’ve learned a lot…

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FURTHER ADVENTURES OF SIR RODERICK

Old fireplace and oven.

Copyright: Rachel Bjerke

Here we are back for another week, gathered in a virtual inn near a small village surrounded by countryside. We’re here for a meeting of the Friday Fictioneers to discuss our original stories for the week. Our hostess for this gathering is the gracious and talented author and artist, Rochelle Wisoff-Fields. The challenge for this group is to write a story whith no more than 100 words. It’s supposed to have a beginning, middle, end, and follow the picture prompt for the week. This week’s picture was supplied by Rachel Bjerke. Thanks, Rachel. To read the other stories from group members, just follow the link given below and click on the little blue frog in the blue box.

The link for the other stories is as follows:

https://rochellewisofffields.wordpress.com/2015/03/18/20-march-2015/

Genre: Humor Fiction

Word Count: 100 Words

A bit of backstory: Some time back, Sir Roderick’s ghost returned after a sleep of 400 years. The link for that first story is as follows:

https://patriciaruthsusan.wordpress.com/2014/12/24/sir-roderick-returns/

We are now following him to his next adventure. He’s decided to check on his favorite tavern nearby the castle. He’s also searching for any friends who may be around to bring him up-to-date and offer companionship. We find him reaching the sight of the tavern. We will read further episodes as he continues to learn his plight from friends along the way. Now for today’s story.

FURTHER ADVENTURES OF SIR RODERICK by P.S. Joshi

Sir Roderick was greatly disappointed when he saw the Spotted Stallion, his favorite drinking place. The wooden structure of inn and stables had rotted leaving only the brick fireplace and oven with the kitchen chimney. The woods had taken over the courtyard.

He was overjoyed at seeing both his old friend, Sir Thomas, and his favorite serving girl, Rose.

Thomas greeted him with a hug and moist eyes, “Roderick, you old scoundrel. I knew you’d be back.”

Rose greeted him with a peck on the cheek.

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…new… University crash courses in Author-ology and Blogger-ology…

This is truly hilarious. 😀

Seumas Gallacher

…today, I’ve sent a whoosh of messages to the Oxford and Cambridge Universities Boards of Governors recommending the addition of new, eclectic courses of education to reflect the reality of modern day publishing… the WURLD is changing, and no more rapidly than in the fields of scribbling endeavour… if the planet is to continue to savour literary masterpieces a la Chuck Dickens, Billy Shakespeare and that wee Rowling lassie, a new approach to the quill-scraping industry is required immediately, if not sooner, Mabel… and if the Governors need any guidance, and are looking for ‘insider’ pointers, then I’m yer Huckleberry… more specific details may be had on application with the usual postal order for expenses to this ol’ Jurassic, but here’s a flavour of what yeez can expect from my proposed curricula:

Author-ology Course, to cover:

–elemental distinction between ‘Pantsers’ and ‘Plotters’

–how to re-fill the…

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AS THE GENERAL SLEPT

 Copyright: Barbara Beacham

This is my weekly contribution to Monday’s Finish the Story, hosted by Barbara Beacham. Every Monday, Barb supplies a new picture prompt along with the first sentence for the story. The original story to be written should have only 100 to 150 additional words. I’ve bolded the first sentence given with the picture prompt. Be sure to click on the little blue frog in the blue box to read the other stories.

The link for all the other stories is as follows:

http://mondaysfinishthestory.wordpress.com/2015/03/16/mondays-finish-the-story-march-16th-2015/

Genre: Realistic Fiction

Word Count: 4+13+150=167 Words

AS THE GENERAL SLEPT by P.S. Joshi

A body suddenly crashed through a plate glass window at the Brigader’s house.

The general shot up like a broken bow string, immediately awake. His responses were sharpened by battlefield experiences. His wife just groaned and rolled over, still sleeping off the alcohol she’d consumed.

The party last night had been a triumph; the front room had been cleaned by the caterers before they left. The general could afford the best as his books about his battle experiences had been huge successes.

He rolled out of bed, slid his feet into his comfortable old slippers, and went to check the living room.

In front of the broken window was a body, bullet hole in the head, handgun nearby. The brigadier’s bodyguard was squatting alongside.

“He’s the one who sent threatening letters, sir. One of your troops who suffered from battle fatigue, and he was aiming at me.”

The general sighed. “Poor man. Wounded since then, and now he’s another war fatality.

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