LOVELY BARCELONA

Barcelona-2006-011

Copyright: Dee Lovering

We’re here for another week, gathered around a virtual computer in a virtual college dorm room, in a virtual college. We’re here as the Friday Fictioneers to discuss our original stories for this week. Our hostess for this gathering–she’s not virtual by the way–is the gracious and talented author and artist, Rochelle Wisoff-Fields. The challenge for this group is to write a story with no more than 100 words. It’s supposed to have a beginning, middle, end, and follow the picture prompt for the week. This week’s prompt was supplied by Dee Lovering. Thanks, Dee.

To read the other stories from group members, just click on the little blue frog in the blue box after clicking on the link. The link for the other stories is as follows:

https://rochellewisofffields.wordpress.com/2015/04/29/1-may-2015/

Genre: Humor Fiction

Word Count: 100 Words

LOVELY BARCELONA by P.S. Joshi

Laura sat at the computer planning her new story. She decided it would begin in Barcelona, Spain. She could hear the click of the castanets and feel the sunshine.

She’d read a piece on how to write a story in a week. She now had to place her chosen characters there. They would be college students on vacation from the U.S. She didn’t know anything about college students from anywhere else.

Her roommate, Dorothy, walked in. She read the beginning story over Laura’s shoulder.

“Hah,” she remarked. “Just how do these students have the money to go to Barcelona, Spain?”

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37 thoughts on “LOVELY BARCELONA

    • Thanks, Bjorn. She’ll need to find a way to supply her characters with money and do a bit of research for that story. Either that, or she’ll have to do as you suggest and bring it closer to home. I’m so glad you enjoyed the story. πŸ™‚ — Suzanne

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  1. Although I can understand how this can be an imagination killer, it is always best to nip potential issues like these in the bud before a reader gets hold of it.
    Good story!

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  2. Money is an annoying reality that a lot of stories skip. My wife went to Sevilla for a semester in college but the answer to how she paid for that was “student loans” and I’m pretty sure we’re still paying for it. πŸ™‚

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  3. Dear Suzanne,

    One of the important things in writing is to tie up all those challenging loose ends. If one person asks ‘how’ or ‘why’ you know someone else will. Great use of the prompt that gives us all something to think about as writers.

    Shalom,

    Rochelle

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  4. Haha, this is perfect. There are these wonderful, unique plot ideas and then logic (or Dorothy) come along and ask these annoying questions. Better answer them right away, or Laura will find herself in a huge plot hole later on. πŸ™‚

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  5. But of course there must be castanets! According to my wife, all Spanish music must include castanets–it’s in the Spanish constitution. (I haven’t found any other sources that back her up on this, but I haven’t exactly tried to debunk her theory either.)

    Fun story within a story.

    All my best,
    Marie Gail

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  6. How to write a story in a week…lol! At least Laura has more than 100 words to work with πŸ™‚ Dorothy seems impatient but helpful.
    I did enjoy this piece, Suzanne
    Ellespeth

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  7. Dear PatriciaRuthSusan, I love your story and I think Mommy & Daddy pay for most of the rich kids trek overseas. They can then brag that “Junior” has gone to Europe on “holiday.” Great job! Nan

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    • Thanks, Nan. I’m so glad you liked the story. You’re not the only one who mentioned it was the parents who paid for the trip. That’s more than likely. πŸ™‚ — Suzanne

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    • Thanks, Jacqueline. Yes, and even more I really dislike it when someone stands and watches when I put in my code to use the internet. That could happen when I used to use an internet cafe here. πŸ™‚ — Suzanne

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