I HAD A FRIEND

City Hall in Country

Photo Copyright: Barbara W. Beacham

Here is my contribution for this week to Monday’s Finish the Story, hosted by Barbara W. Beacham. Every Monday Barbara supplies a new picture prompt along with the first sentence for the story. The original story to be written should have only 100 to 150 additional words. I’ve bolded the first sentence given with the picture prompt. Be sure to click on the little blue frog in the blue box, after clicking on the link, to read the other stories by the group. The link is as follows:

https://mondaysfinishthestory.wordpress.com/2015/06/29/mondays-finish-the-story-june-29th-2015/

Genre: Speculative Fiction

Word Count: 4+12+142=158

I HAD A FRIEND by P.S. Joshi

“The Mayor and the town manager waved as their next victims approached.” The voice of the narrator went on.

I said to my daughter, “That’s about a real town.”

She looked at me to see if I was serious. “How could that be? How do you know?”

I hesitated, but had begun to tell, so continued. “I had a friend who lived there with her husband, and we emailed each other. One day she stopped. I also knew her niece, so asked her what had happened.

“The tears ran down the niece’s face, and she seemed to make a decision.Finally she said her mother learned they had died somehow and drove there for the funeral. She never returned. Later she emailed saying they were all three living together and for her daughter never to come there.

“The girl emailed back asking why, and her mother just emailed , ‘We don’t glitter in the sun.'” *

*This is in reference to the Twilight Saga by Stephanie Meyer. Symbol for Monday's Finish the Story anniversary-1x purple-flowers-may-2013 Written  Act of Kindness Award tour-through-blogland-21

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Estate Planning Basics for the Self-Published Writer

Great advice. Thanks, Chris and Susan, for bringing us this information.

Chris The Story Reading Ape's Blog

(Extract) As a writer, part of what you will leave behind is your collected works – a body of work that, if attended to and managed, may thrive long past your physical demise. If you are interested in having your written work survive you to be read by future generations and perhaps provide a source of income for your heirs – you need to plan for it…

To read the rest of this very informative article by Kathryn Goldman, click on her photo or link below:

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You can also get further information from my very good friend, blog partner and Professional Editor Susan Uttendorfskyby clicking HERE.

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Eye of the beholder

Great piece. Thanks, Sue.

Sue Vincent's Daily Echo

the-toilet-of-venus-peter-paul-rubens The Toilet of Venus, Rubens c.1614

“…item, two lips indifferent red; item, two grey eyes, with lids to them; item, one neck, one chin, and so forth.”

Twelfth Night, William Shakespeare

Let’s be clear… fashions change, in beauty as in all else. Many of the celebrated beauties of history would not cut the mustard by today’s standards. Cleopatra had a big nose. Emma Hamilton, mistress of Lord Nelson, was fat by the time they met. And Rubens’ Venus had cellulite. The list could go on. These women, accounted great beauties in their day, to modern eyes may lack that certain something we are almost indoctrinated to seek. Was it just fashion that gave them their place in history? Or was there more to these women? Charm, grace, laughter and intellect; or did they exude that sensuality that attracts regardless of face?

I was speaking with a woman today, very beautiful…

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BEWARE OF THE DOOR

 

A Shop in a Mall

Photo Copyright: Kent Bonham

Here we are again this week. Today we’re sitting on benches in front of a virtual shop at the mall. We’re here to discuss our original stories for the week. This is the Friday Fictioneer’s group. Our hostess is the gracious and talented author and artist, Rochelle Wisoff-Fields. The challenge for each of us is to write a story with no more than 100 words. It’s supposed to have a beginning, middle, end, and follow the picture prompt provided for the week. This week’s prompt was supplied by Kent Bonham. Thanks, Kent.

To read the other stories from group members, just click on the little blue frog in the blue box after clicking on the link. The link for the other stories this week is as follows:

http://rochellewisofffields.wordpress.com/2015/06/24/26-june-2015/

Genre: Speculative Fiction

Word Count: 100 Words

BEWARE OF THE DOOR by P.S. Joshi

It was a women’s clothing shop in the mall, but more. In the back was a changing room with a sign saying, “DON’T ENTER.” It only opened for certain people. This was a door to your past. The problem was, when you walked through, the door sealed.

Betty was curious and opened it one afternoon. She found herself in her old bedroom at age fifteen.

Suddenly her mother ran in, blood on her face.

“Quick, hide Betty. Your father is drunk again.”

Suddenly she felt the old fear seize her and noticed her bruises. She ducked down under her bed.

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MA AND THE WIND CHIMES

 

Redneck Wind Chimes

Photo Copyright: Barbara W. Beacham

This is my contribution for this week to Monday’s Finish the Story, hosted by Barbara W. Beacham. Every Monday, Barbara supplies a new picture prompt along with the first sentence for the story. The original story to be written should have only 100 to 150 additional words. I’ve bolded the first sentence given with the picture prompt.

Be sure to click on the little blue frog in the blue box, after clicking on the link, to read the other stories. The link for all other stories is as follows:

https://mondaysfinishthestory.wordpress.com/2015/06/22/381/

Genre: Humor Fiction

Word Count: 5+11+150=166 Words

MA AND THE WIND CHIMES by P.S. Joshi

“Hey boys, how ’bout y’ll makin’ yer Ma some wind chimes.”

Ma Wilkes had been to the city to visit Cousin Flo. Flo had somethin’ hangin’ on her porch she called “wind chimes.” Flo was always buyin’ some new thing from her favorite catalog. Her husband had a good job at the mill.

Ma liked the tinklin’ sound and thought, “Now this is real class.”

Back home, she called her boys together. Luke, Micah, and Jed came in and gathered round. “What you want, Ma?” She had that determined look they knew so well.

Ma explained and the boys agreed. They loved Ma and always listened to her even though the youngest of them was past forty. Even before Pa died she’d been the boss. Besides, she did all the cookin’.

The trash was checked. Empty cans and some old cord was found. They could all whittle.

Ma could hardly wait. In two days the boys gave her their finest effort.

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#Read about Guest #Author D. Wallace Peach

I love your writing, D. Great interview.

Chris The Story Reading Ape's Blog

Thanks, Chris, for the opportunity to monkey around on your famous blog! I’ve seen your invites for several months and have said to myself “someday.” It appears someday has arrived.

D. Wallace PeachI’m one of those writers who rarely struggles with writer’s block. I can write 16 hours a day and never run dry of words …until someone asks me to write about myself. My mind goes blank, every articulate thought sucked through a black hole into another dimension. The urge to regurgitate my 3rd grade demographics starts sounding like a decent backup plan. What does a fantasy writer who lives entirely in her head have to say about her “real” life?

I didn’t start writing until I turned fifty… ancient compared to most writers I know. Am I envious of those enjoying an early start, regretful that it took me so long to find my calling? You betcha. If I could…

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PLEASE BE WARNED

hyde-hall-light

Photo Copyright: Rochelle Wisoff-Fields

Here we are again this week. Today we’re strolling through a virtual mansion built in the early 19th Century. We’re here to discuss our original stories for the week. This is the Friday Fictioneer’s group. Our hostess, who leads us to a gathering in the massive virtual dining room, is the gracious and talented author and artist, Rochelle Wisoff-Fields. The challenge for each of us is to write a story with no more than 100 words. It’s supposed to have a beginning, middle, end, and follow the picture prompt for the week. This week’s prompt was supplied by Rochelle. Thanks again, Rochelle.

To read the other stories from group members, just click on the little blue frog in the blue box, after clicking on the link. The link for the other stories this week is as follows:

https://rochellewisofffields.wordpress.com/2015/06/17/19-june-2015/

Genre: Speculative Fiction

Word Count: 100 Words

PLEASE BE WARNED by P.S. Joshi

How I wish now I’d never let my cousin Bea talk me into  going to inspect the old Marlowe place. It had been a stunner in its day–all marble, crystal, hand carving, and hardwood flooring. Now it was an empty, dusty, rotting shell, smelling of mold and mildew.

No one had lived in it for decades since the tragedy of the last Marlowes. Mr. Marlowe had gone insane, shooting his wife and three children.

I noticed the chill when we walked in. It was 90 degrees outside.

The worst part was the children heard my name and followed me out.

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20 Symptoms of Writeritis

Hilarious, D. Thanks for making my day with this piece. I thoroughly enjoyed it. So true.

Myths of the Mirror

image from pinterest.com image from pinterest.com

As some of you know, a pervasive syndrome has troubled a segment of society for centuries. After years of research, the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders finally classified these symptoms under the diagnosis: Writeritis. 

Writeritis is defined as a persistent, maladaptive pattern of writing that leads to clinically significant impairment or distress, as manifested by six (or more) of the following within a single month:

  1. A marked craving for increased amounts of writing, and longer periods of time to write.

  2. An unquenchable thirst for coffee.

  3. Repeated efforts to cut down or control word count are unsuccessful.

  4. Withdrawal occurs when writing is discontinued or suddenly reduced. Symptoms include shakiness, moodiness, and/or irritability.

  5. A tendency to rapidly relapse into extreme patterns of excessive rewriting – even after periods of abstinence or control.

  6. After writing, a compulsive urge to return and edit.

  7. An inability to initiate household chores until a plot hole is resolved.

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X-59’S UNSUCCESSFUL EXPLORATION OF EARTH

Marble on the Ground

Copyright: Barbara W. Beacham

This is my contribution for this week to Monday’s Finish the Story, hosted by Barbara W. Beacham. Every Monday, Barbara supplies a new picture prompt along with the first sentence for the story. The original story to be written should have only 100 to 150 additional words. I’ve bolded the first sentence given with the picture prompt. The first line this week was contributed by Eric Wickland of Momusnews. Thanks to both Barbara and Eric.

Be sure to click on the little blue frog in the blue box, after clicking on the link, to read the other stories. The link for all other stories is as follows:

https://mondaysfinishthestory.wordpress.com/2015/06/15/mondays-finish-the-story-june-15th-2015/

Genre: Humor Fiction

Word Count: 5+14+150=169 Words

X-59’S UNSUCCESSFUL EXPLORATION OF EARTH by P.S. Joshi

At first, it looked like an ordinary marble, but it was far from it.

X-59 had made a successful landing. He was sure the Royal Supreme Leader on his planet would reward him handsomely.

He turned on the switch to the cloaking device. However, he made the serious mistake of turning it only part-way. Instead of disappearing completely, the ship now looked like a crystal marble. X-59 had no idea of his ship’s present appearance.

He made ready for his first step into Earth’s atmosphere by climbing into his gravity suit with the built-in breathing device. He prepared to open the door of the spacecraft.

He had landed on the Ridderhaust’s property. They owned chickens. Melody, their hen, would sit on anything round. She was too old to lay eggs, but not to sit on one.

Melody spotted the small object and immediately went into action. It was a bit smaller than the usual egg, but she wasn’t fussy.

X-59 stepped into total darkness.

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