HYDRANGEA’S TRANSPORT

Small plane landing

Photo Copyright: Barbara W. Beacham

This is my contribution for this week to Monday’s Finish the Story, hosted by Barbara W. Beacham. Every Monday, Barbara supplies a new picture prompt along with the first sentence for the story. The original story to be written should have only 100 to 150 additional words. I’ve bolded the first sentence given with the picture prompt.

This week, the first sentence was contributed by one of the writers, Martin Furman. A big, “Thanks,” to both Barbara and Martin this week.

Be sure to click on the little blue frog in the blue box, after clicking on the link, to read the other stories. The link for all other stories this week is as follows:

https://mondaysfinishthestory.wordpress.com/2015/07/13/mondays-finish-the-story-july-13th-2015/

Genre: Humor Fiction

Word Count: 2+26+150=178 Words

HYDRANGEA’S TRANSPORT by P.S. Joshi

“Delphin always wanted to pilot her father’s plane and when he forgot his keys on her tenth birthday, she knew that taking off would be easy.”

Hydrangea read from her granddaughter, Orchid’s, book.

“Oh pooh, I can teach Orchid how to travel in classier style,” she thought.  “After all, I’m a sorceress.”

She scooted to the basement and started to root through cartons.

“Ah, found it,” she shouted. She tugged and mothballs flew into the air. Out came an ancient, threadbare rug with some fringe missing.

“I better take it for a brief test drive,” she thought.

Taking it to the backyard, she sat in the middle of the rug. Her cat, Patience, joined her.

Out came her wand. She waved it in the air and shouted, “Airbournicus.” The old rug shuddered and rose into the air.

“Fly east by northeast,” she shouted.

“You don’t need to shout, you know,” said the rug in proud disgust.

“The man who sold you to me didn’t say you could talk,” said Hydrangea.

“Never mind, just ride,” said the rug.

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Oliver Sacks: Why I Write Journals

This is a lovely piece. Thank you Rosanna for sharing.

Writing on the Pages of Life

Two days ago, on July 9, Maria Popova of Brain Pickings wrote an impassioned introduction to her post:

“As you might know, my heart holds immense love and respect for Dr. Oliver Sacks, one of the most luminous minds and exuberant spirits of our time. As you might also know, he is dying. Today is his eighty-second birthday – his last. To celebrate this bittersweet occasion, I decided to honor Dr. Sacks by dusting off one of his earliest works, which speaks to his remarkable personhood more vibrantly than any other, and writing this piece, into which I’ve poured more love than into any other since Brain Pickings began nine years ago.”

I know of Oliver Sacks because of his book, Oaxaca Journal, where he writes of his adventures on a trip to Oaxaca in Mexico to explore ferns with his botanical friends. I love ferns and journaling, which…

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Enter, the beast

Lovely story.

Tracee Ford

If you love animals, you know that there is much more that goes on with them then what can be seen on the surface. I saw a video yesterday that had me in tears, not because it was sad, but because I was touched by its beauty. I did some research and found the video below on YouTube. I got out the tissues again as I watched it.

We underestimate the power of love in all its glory. Love has a way of breaking boundaries and tearing down walls. This video is proof of that. On a human level, this also applies. Everyone has the right to love and be loved. That is what makes it so powerful. When you put limits on that power, you are missing the entire purpose of its splendor.

Case in point, who would have guessed a beast would have connected so deeply with humans…

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Infinite Waters: 9+1 Speculative Fiction Short Stories now Released!

Read all about Nicholas’ latest book that’s now released.

Nicholas C. Rossis

Woo hoo, exciting stuff! As promised, Infinite Waters: 9+1 Speculative Fiction Short Stories has now been released and is available on Amazon. In fact, it’s free on Kindle Unlimited!

I was planning on a big promo, but all of my funds are currently frozen (they have even forbidden us access to our safety deposit boxes). Even worse, PayPal has suspended operations in Greece (although I’m busy opening a new, UK-based account). So, I would very much appreciate any help in spreading the word while this mess is sorted out!

The anthology includes the following stories:

  1. Infinite Waters“: A woman seeks her future at a carnival. She discovers more than she expected.”
  2. The Things We Do for Lust“: Beware of Greek gods bearing gifts.
  3. The Twist in the Tale“: A confused woman meanders through a sleepy town. But not all is as it seems.

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BIGGLESTON CITY’S PROBLEM

Tunnel

Photo Copyright: Stephen Baum

Here we are again this week. Today we’re sitting in a virtual cafe near a virtual tunnel in the city. We’re here to once more discuss our original stories for the week. This is the Friday Fictioneer’s group. Our hostess is the gracious and talented author and artist, Rochelle Wisoff-Fields. The challenge for each of us is to write a story with no more than 100 words. It’s supposed to have a beginning, middle, end, and follow the picture prompt provided for the week. This week’s prompt was supplied by Stephen Baum. Thanks, Stephen. To read the group’s other stories, just click on the little blue frog in the blue box after clicking on the link. The link for the other stories this week is as follows:

https://rochellewisofffields.wordpress.com/2015/07/08/10-july-2015/

Genre: Humor Fiction

Word Count: 100 Words

BIGGLESTON CITY’S PROBLEM by P.S. Joshi

Biggleston City was growing and had a big problem. The traffic on McTweety Street was terrible. The city council had a meeting.

In the meeting it was suggested a new traffic light be put up.

“But,” said one councilman, “there are frequent power failures in the city so a light won’t work.”

“Ah,” said another councilman, “Let’s build a tunnel under the street. We’ll call it a subway.”

So it was decided. A fine tunnel was built lined with tile.

The next spring it rained and rained. The new subway filled with water. Another council meeting was called to order.

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HERMIONIE’S HOPPING HEDGE

 

Artistic Hedge Figures

Photo Copyright: Barbara W. Beacham

This is my contribution for this week to Momday’s Finish the Story, hosted by Barbara W. Beacham. Every Monday, Barbara supplies a new picture prompt along with the first sentence for the story. The original story to be written should have only 100 to 150 additional words. I’ve bolded the first sentence given with the picture prompt.

This week, the first sentence was contributed by one of the writers, Alistair Phillips. A big thanks to both Barbara and Ali this week.

Be sure to click on the little blue frog in the blue box, after clicking on the link, to read the other stories. The link for all other stories this week is as follows:

https://mondaysfinishthestory.wordpress.com/2015/07/06/mondays-finish-the-story-july-6th-2015/

Genre: Humor Fiction

Word Count: 3+14+148=165 Words

HERMIONIE’S HOPPING HEDGE by P.S. Joshi

The barista shook his head. “That hedge couldn’t have moved closer overnight. Could it?”

Hermionie Pipdittle was the local sorceress-in-residence. She wasn’t a malicious spell-caster, in fact, quite spirited and jolly.

Now aging, she worried her spells might be weakening, so sought something to practice on.

People wouldn’t do. Dixie Pringle had been furious when she’d turned orange that time. All she was meant to turn was a delicate pink, hardly noticable on a sunny day.

Then there was Harold Knickerbocker, a sound sleeper, whose wife called the hospital to have him declared dead when he turned gray one afternoon.

Oh, and there was also the unfortunate case of Latitia Markbottom who grew those elm branches from her head.

The local inn had an artistically-cut, though boring, hedge designed to attract tourists. It needed something to liven it up.

Hermionie waved her wand. “Jumpytitis,” she shouted.

The hedge hopped a bit, nothing spectacular. It hopped again, and again, and again. “Perfect.”

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100 Questions to Ask Yourself Before You Write Your Novel

This is great preparation for writing either a short story or a novel.

Story Fabric

I came across this blog post, and since I’ll definitely be looking at these questions as I get ready to start working on my novella for class, I thought I would share.

From thescriptlab.com

The Main Character

1. Who is your main character? Hero? Anti-hero?

2. Why should we be interested in them?

3. What attracts you to your protagonist? Do you like them? Loathe them?

4. Why do you need to write about them?

5. Why should we be excited about them?

6. Why do you believe we will find your hero sympathetic? Empathetic?

7. What makes us curious about them? What is their “mystery”? What is their “magic”? Charisma? How do you show it?

8. What does the audience find in the main character’s story that is relevant to them? Why do you believe they will identify with them?

9. What is the cherished secret desire of your…

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Cover Reveal: The Sorcerer’s Garden

This is another beautiful cover and enchanting story from author D. Peach. Be sure to watch for its launch date.

Myths of the Mirror

Sorcerer's Garden 2

Scheduled for Release August 20, 2015

Interested in a ARC copy? Please let me know ❤
Also available now as a Preorder on Amazon.

The Sorcerer’s Garden

Recently fired and residing with her sweetly overbearing mother, Madlyn needs a job—bad. In a moment of desperation, she accepts a part-time position reading at the bedside of adventurer and amateur writer Cody Lofton. A near-drowning accident left the young man in a vegetative state, and his chances of recovery wane with each passing day.

Cody’s older brother, Dustin, and eccentric grandmother aren’t prepared to give up on the youngest son of Portland, Oregon’s royalty.

Dustin’s a personable guy, bordering on naïve, and overwhelmed by familial corporate duties and cutthroat partners. Grandmother Lillian’s a meddler with an eye for the esoteric, dabbling in Dustin’s life and dealing out wisdom like a card shark. One innocent conversation at a time, she sucks Madlyn…

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