THE GREAT EDWARDO

Library filing cabinets for books & documents.

Photo Copyright: Claire Fuller

Here we are once again. This week we’re in a library basement where there are document lockers. This is the Friday Fictioneers group and we’re here with our guide and hostess, the gracious and talented Rochelle Wisoff-Fields. The challenge for each of us is to write a story with no more than 100 words. It’s supposed to have a beginning, middle, end, and follow the picture prompt provided for the week. This week’s prompt was supplied by Claire Fuller. Thanks, Claire.

To read the other stories from group members, just click on the little blue frog in the blue box after clicking on the link. The link for the other stories this week is as follows:

https://rochellewisofffields.wordpress.com/2015/08/26/28-august-2015/

Genre: Humor Fiction

Word Count: 98 Words

THE GREAT EDWARDO by P.S. Joshi

Deep underground are lockers. Not ordinary lockers, they’re reinforced steel with special combination locks.

This is the repository for The Great Edwardo’s magic tricks. World famous, he was terrified another magician would steal his secrets.

Over the years he’d inherited, or bought, tricks such as sawing a woman in thirds, disappearing from one box onstage to another, now having different-colored hair and his clothes on backwards, and pulling two-headed blue rabbits out of a hat.

Then he suddenly died ten years ago and no one’s gotten into the lockers since. People wondered if he planned it that way.

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#Bloggers Beware: You CAN get SUED for using Pics on your Blog…

Vital information. Please read.

Chris The Story Reading Ape's Blog

Further to an update from my blog partner

Professional Editor Susan Uttendorfsky

Dun Writin’—Now Whut?

Sharing Content, Copyrights, and Permissions

54 Part 1 and 55 Part 2

also apply to using photos

See this blog post of a blogger who was sued over using a copyrighted photo,

even with a disclaimer:

By clicking on the image or link below:

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LUIGI

 

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Photo Copyright: Barbara W. Beacham

This is my contribution for this week to Monday’s Finish the Story, hosted by Barbara W. Beacham. Every Monday Barbara supplies a new picture prompt along with the first sentence for the story. The original story to be written should have only 100 to 150 additional words. I’ve bolded the part of the first sentence given with the picture prompt.

Be sure to click on the little blue frog in the blue box, after clicking on the link, to read the other stories. The link for all other stories this week is as follows:

http://mondaysfinishthestory.wordpress.com/2015/08/24/mondays-finish-the-story-august-14th-2015/

Genre: Humor Fiction

Word Count: 1+13+150=164 Words

LUIGI by P.S. Joshi

The family had no idea that little Luigi would grow up to be the greatest failure since Napoleon’s invasion of Russia.

He started out well, but was overfed and couldn’t be squeezed into a highchair.

He didn’t get good marks in school. The teacher said, “He’s a daydreamer and doesn’t listen.”

He tried working for his brother, Nunzio, in the grocery business, but was too shy to talk to customers and priced items wrong. Nunzio finally said, “You’re fired.”

It turned out though he had a colorful imagination and a brilliant sense of humor. He bought some paper and a pen and started to write. He wrote hilarious stories about characters suspiciously resembling his family members.

At first none read his stories so all went well. Then his cousin, Angela, read one and recognized herself. She was furious. His brother, Rico, was next, then his sister, Renata.

He started to make money so they had to keep their mouths shut. The stories continued.

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…why should an Author bother with an Online Launch Party?… this ol’ Scots scribbler’s two cents worth…

Seumas’ launches are always great. Congratulations, Seumas! 🙂

Seumas Gallacher

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…one of the beauties of being Writers is that we are each entitled to our own individual opinions… those of yeez who honour me by reading my Blog will know I’m not averse to offering my own slant on scribblers’ stuff… my personal approach to writing is holistic inasmuch as the creation of yer masterpieces is only one element of the entire process… ‘the business of writing’… throw in the need for managing the proof-reading, the editing, the cover artwork, the formatting for the Great God Amazon Kindle if the eBook route is called for… most of these latter functions are generally better handled with an eye and a brain other than the Author himself/herself… but whether yeez are self-published or ‘housed’, the lion’s share of the promotional and marketing activity devolves on the Author… the SOSYAL NETWURKS’ is not a ‘concept’…it’s a reality to be…

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OOParts – Curiosities That Can’t Be Ignored?

Interesting information indeed.

Terri Herman-Ponce

My writing, especially in paranormal and alternate history, takes me to some very interesting places. Lately, I’ve been spending a good amount of time studying up on OOParts (Out Of Place Artifacts), which is a term applied to prehistoric objects found throughout the world that defy their level of technology, and are at odds with their age based on physical, geological, or chemical evidence.

“They are often frustrating to conventional scientists and a delight to adventurous investigators and individuals interested in alternative scientific theories.”

There are many within scientific mainstream who dismiss OOParts in general, claiming their history can be explained, their creation is not out of place to the historical period in which they’re aligned, and that the people who built or constructed them were entirely capable of doing so. In short, it’s Occam’s Razor at work: the simplest answer or explanation is often the correct one.

And yet there…

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