FLOOD DAMAGE

 

Flooded street--Al Forbes--September-4th-2016

Photo Copyright: Al Forbes

This story was written for Sunday Photo Fiction–September 4th, 2016. Each week the host, Al Forbes, provides a picture prompt. The challenge for each member of the group is to write an original story or poem with no more than 200 words, not including the title and inspired by the prompt.

To read the other stories written by group members, just click on the link below, then on the little blue frog in the blue box.

The link to the other stories this week is as follows:

https://sundayphotofictioner.wordpress.com/2016/09/04/sunday-photo-fiction-september-4th-2016/

Genre: Realistic Fiction

Word Count: 200 Words

FLOOD DAMAGE by P.S. Joshi

When his great grandfather came west from Pennsylvania, the Missouri land was rich and water was plentiful. He bought farm acreage near a stream so water would be close. Carrying it was no easy task back then.

One hundred and fifty years later, John paid for the mistake his ancestor had made. The Missouri River tended to flood in years when rain poured down on his farm. He couldn’t afford to move as there was a mortgage on the land. He had to take the mortgage to pay for water damage and buy more livestock for some lost in a flood.

Now the insurance company refused to give insurance at the normal rate. Next year they warned there would be no insurance offered.

His youngest son wanted to begin college, and John had to tell him he’d have to earn scholarships and work to pay for the remainder himself.

“That’s okay, Dad,” he said. “I can do that.” But his girlfriend wanted to get married so he joined the army. The second year of his service in Iraq, he was killed by a landmine. His wife had a child so moved in with John and his wife.

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20 thoughts on “FLOOD DAMAGE

    • Thanks, Diana. You understand because you were raised in the country. Sometimes I think people raised in cities don’t fully understand the situation. They blame people for getting themselves into that situation by building in those places when it was the ancestors who built there. Those farmers or town dwellers have an investment in the land. They’re heartbroken and in poverty if they have to move away. It’s the only home they’ve ever known. I’m pleased you liked the story. —- Suzanne

      Liked by 1 person

  1. That’s sad Susan, but I doubt his great- grandfather knew what damage it would die to later generations. So sad him having to get loans and take out mortgages. I know it would be expensive to move and that the land is in the family, but perhaps it actually is better to start anew? I’m sad for his son. I don’t believe it’s bad he had to pay for his education, he certainly valued it then. However, dying in Iraq is awful for his entire family. Hopefully, God willing the three of them figure something out. Great write!

    Liked by 1 person

    • Thanks, Mandibelle. He might be forced to start over again. Maybe his other grown children can help. The daughter-in-law can probably get a job but has only finished high school. She may marry again in time. The farmer can’t farm again unless he works for others. Other farms in the area probably have the same problems if they’re all in the flood zone. He’s middle-aged so it will be hard. His wife will probably have to babysit the grandchild. It’ll be rough. I’m pleased you liked the story. —- Suzanne

      Liked by 1 person

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