Cannot see the wood for the trees?

Another exceptional tale from Jim and Tallis.

Tallis Steelyard

lady-godiva-by-william-holmes-sullivan-1877

It has to be confessed that there are many outlandish and eccentric services patrons require from their poets. This is even after setting aside salacious suggestions, for which I have a number of well rehearsed answers, plus the support of a couple of reliably louche poets of a younger generation whom I can fall back on. Still one of the more intriguing came from the Lady Doleria. She was a pleasant lady, widowed in early middle age, and she divided her time between her children and the company of friends. Had she wanted one, she could even have had a perfectly good feud as well, in that her neighbour, Madam Erdwill, was intent on having one with her.

Unlike many of these feuds, everybody was perfectly clear how, when and even why, it began. Lady Doleria married her merchant husband whilst she was very young. Over-confident he purchased a fine…

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THE OLD NEIGHBORHOOD

 

Photo Copyright:  J. Hardy Carroll

Here we are this week gathered near a building that’s being torn down. We’ve gathered to discuss our original stories for the week. This is the Friday Fictioneers group. Our hostess for the gathering is the talented and gracious author and artist, Rochelle Wisoff Fields. The challenge for each of us this week and every week is to write a story with no more than 100 words, not counting the title. It’s supposed to have a beginning, middle, end, and follow the picture prompt for the week. This week’s prompt was provided by J. Hardy Carroll. Thanks, J. Hardy.

To read the other stories by group members, just click on the link given below, then on the little blue frog in the blue box. The link for this week’s stories is as follows:

https://rochellewisofffields.wordpress.com/2017/05/24/26-may-2017/

Genre: Memoir Fiction

Word Count: 99 Words

THE OLD NEIGHBOORHOOD by P.S. Joshi

George remembers the old neighborhood.

“I was born above the grocery store owned by my parents. I sauntered the five blocks to and from school on weekdays and ran two blocks on Sunday afternoons to the park to play baseball with pals.

After homework, I assisted in the store. My parents never ate together as someone had to mind the downstairs counter. No doubt I’d take over and run things on my dad’s retirement.

But it wasn’t to be. My father retired when a contractor bought the property for a large office building and two square blocks became rubble.”

E-Waste: What you need to know [Infographic]

An educational infographic.

ravenhawks' magazine

Since the start of 2017, we have thrown out more than 6.4m tonnes of electronic goods, according to The World Counts, a website keeping a live tally of global e-waste. If past patterns are any judge, not much of this will get properly recycled: less than a sixth of the e-waste discarded around the world in 2014 was dealt with in this way, says the UN.

05222017_ewasteknow

via E-Waste: What you need to know [Infographic] — ecogreenlove

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Now available in paperback

Ordinary Handsome is now in paperback.

Ordinary Handsome

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Fifty-seven years ago I killed a boy. Tonight, Euart Monroe walked into my room with a Mossberg 510 and a stained hobo mattress and fired a shot into my belly. It should have killed me right off, but he didn’t want that. He wanted me to know who pulled the trigger.

***
I’m excited to announce that Ordinary Handsome is now available in paperback. It’s an oversize 6.69″ x  9.61″ book with a matte cover and cream pages. Pardon the indulgence, but it really is quite handsome. Weighing in at a whopping 187 pages, it’s got a spanky new cover and even a tiny author photo on the back for your mustache-drawing indulgence. Please check it out and let me know what you think. As always, thank you for reading. — Steve

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The Unjust Department of “Justice”

Information

Filosofa's Word

AG Sessions has some explaining to do. This will either take a long time or a very short time.Four weeks ago, the Northwest Immigrant Rights Project (NWIRP)  —a respected nonprofit in Seattle that represents immigrants in deportation proceedings—received a “cease and desist” letter from the Department of Justice, aka Attorney General Jeff Sessions, threatening disciplinary action. The letter  demanded that NWIRP drop representation of its clients and close down its asylum-advisory program. What prompted this action on the part of the DOJ?  In all likelihood, it was because NWIRP has been at the forefront of resisting Trump’s travel ban. Its staff and volunteer lawyers were at SeaTac airport immediately after the White House launched the first Muslim ban, and in March it sued to block the second Muslim ban.

Last week, NWIRP filed a lawsuit to defend itself against the DOJ’s order—and on Wednesday, a judge granted a restraining order.   So for now, the organization can keep helping immigrants who need legal advice. But…

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Sally’s Cafe and Bookstore – New on the Shelves – 1066 by Jack Eason

Sally’s review of Jack Eason’s book 1066.

Smorgasbord Blog Magazine

I am very happy to welcome Jack Eason to the Cafe and Bookstore with his new historical novella 1066. I am also delighted to include my review for the book.

About the book

Down the centuries the British Isles has always been seen by invaders as a legitimate target for exploitation. This novella concerns the last few weeks of Anglo-Saxon occupation, ending on the 14th of October, 1066. In Autumn 1066, author Jack Eason gives a great sense of ‘place’, of detail. The reader is right ‘there’ in that poignant year, marching, shivering with September cold (as ‘…no warming fires were allowed lest ‘enemy spies would soon spot their approach.’) From the very first few lines, Eason, practising his unique drycraft, begins to weave his particular brand of magic on his reader. Eason glamour’s with well-crafted dialogue, drawing his reader into the time and into the action. To accomplish…

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