Looking the part.

Another fabulous story told by Tallis Steelyard and penned by Jim Webster.

Tallis Steelyard

the Alchemist

As I walk the streets of Port Naain, it strikes me how people try and look the part. Setting aside the mercenary horseman cantering by, you have the butcher with his blood spattered apron. You have the professional mourner with his dark clothing and his hair artistically disarranged. Then there is the dunnykin diver over there; you can easily spot him, nobody stands within six feet of him and that’s a crowded street. Even I have to look the part. The leading poet of his generation has to dress with casual elegance and adopt an insouciant air.

Orthando the Wise was somebody who took this lesson to heart. He started life as Orthan Shornfuddle and worked as a short-order clerk. Still even then he dressed appropriately. He wore the white pillbox hat, the long brown overall and the inkstained leather glove on his right hand. I have been told that…

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FREE BOOK THIS WEEK!

A FREE BOOK until Friday the 27th of April.

Stevie Turner

Today and until Friday 27th April my new dark novelette ‘Leg-less and Chalaza’ will be FREE on Amazon:

Leg-less and Chalaza coverhttp://bookShow.me/B07952W9F9

I had the idea for this book when poor old Sam needed an Achilles’ tendon repair.  He’s fine now, but fortunately my experience of looking after Sam differed totally from my character Bea Jackson’s!


Blurb:

When Jeff Jackson is told he needs a major operation on his right Achilles’ tendon, to his horror he realises there is only one person he can ask to look after him for a whole six weeks afterwards until the plaster cast is taken off and he can put weight on his leg again. That person is his wife Bea, who currently hates the sight of him and has moved out!

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Raro’s Adogables~

Some travel pictures from Cindy Knoke featuring some friendly dogs.


Rarotonga is the island of happy dogs. No matter what you do, a dog will come with you.

They wait at your door for you to come out.

Swimming?

If you swim, they will come along!

They swim to distant reefs with our son everyday.

Fishing?

Heck yes!

They are master fisherdogs and,

they bring their catch to you!

Hiking? Their paw prints mark your path.

Cheers to you from Rarotonga’s incredible adogables~

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Spring has sprung?

News from the farm and book tour.

Jim Webster

DIGITAL CAMERA

It’s been longer than normal since I last posted. To be honest I’ve been busy. Yes, Jim has been working for a living. It’s something I’m supposed to do from time to time. But anyway, at the start of the week I had to go down to London for agricultural meetings. They were interesting. Agriculture is in a very unusual position at the moment. Defra is consulting and because two years ago nobody expected us to be where we are, nobody has ‘a plan.’

This is a good thing; it means the consultation is real. The cynic in me normally reckons that you read a standard Defra consultation document, as produced under all governments (party makes no difference here) and you’ll find three options.

One is too hot,

One is too cold,

And one is just right.

And it’s obviously the Goldilocks option that they want to implement and you…

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A gofundme page for a teacher I know…

This is for Kawanee’s friend.

https://www.gofundme.com/with-wiley

https://www.fox25boston.com/www.fox25boston.com/news/beloved-boston-teacher-fighting-to-walk-again-after-medical-emergency/734362554

I used to write on a forum with Chris, when he was just a teenager. We’ve fallen out of daily contact, but I still stalk his page and ask him how he’s doing from time to time. I was surprised to find out what all he’s been doing with his life, but he’s been busy helping others and helping mold young minds. Funny how you think of someone as a kid and never think about how they impact others or what they’ll grow up to be when they reach adulthood.

I just remember writing with him as the characters I played interacted with his. His character played one of my character’s dad at one point. He was fun to write with and his character will be in one of my books when I finally get around to editing it. LOL.

Meanwhile, he’s grown up to be a teacher…

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Dirty Laundry

If you enjoyed this post, you’ll also enjoy Russell’s books. Just go to the top of the page and click on BOOKS for ordering information.

What's So Funny?

Not a day goes by that I don’t get a phone call from a total stranger wanting to help me. Yesterday, a young lady named Lisa told me that because I stayed at one of their properties in the past, she wanted to give me a week in Orlando. One of us must have amnesia. I don’t remember staying at their resort.

An hour later, I received an offer to consolidate my credit card debt, thus saving me thousands of dollars. Another caller wanted to provide an extended warranty on our 2001 Toyota. What a blessing to have all these thoughtful people interested in my well-being. Is this a great country, or what?

If you’re new to Friday Flash Fiction, our purple-clad garden gnome, who would love to sell you 100-word overdraft protection, is Mammy Warbucks Wisoff-Fields. If you’d like to participate in this exercise of madness, head over…

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Guest Post – The Foolishness of Love, by Jim Webster.

Another highly amusing and entertaining tale by Tallis Steelyard and penned by Jim Webster.

Stevie Turner

I’m pleased to feature Jim Webster’s short story ‘The Foolishness of Love’ today.  You can find more stories by Jim on his Tallis Steelyard blog:

The foolishness of love.

Have you noticed how there are some men who seem to be fated to be a sad disappointment to their wives yet if they behaved as their wife seems to demand, then they’d end up divorced in short order?

It was the intriguing story of Caster Jessip which reminded me of this truth. Caster was a peddler. He dealt in frills and furbelows, gimcrack jewellery and the off-cuts of machine-made lace which he passed off as perfect for edging and finishing.

He’d started life as the youngest son of peasant farmer on a small farm south of Port Naain. He had soon realised that all life held in store for him was backbreaking toil and no reward. So he’d borrowed some…

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