THE GREAT BOUDICCA

Chariot and rider.

Copyright — Alastair Forbes

This is my contribution to Sunday Photo Fiction for February 8, 2015. Every Sunday a new picture prompt is supplied by Alastair Forbes, the host. The weekly challenge is to write an original story with no more than 200 words. It’s supposed to have a beginning, middle, end, and follow the picture prompt for the week. Be sure to click on the little blue frog in the blue box to read all the other stories.

The link for all other stories is as follows:

http://sundayphotofictioner.wordpress.com/2015/02/08/sunday-photo-fiction-february-8th-2015/

Genre: Historical Fiction

Word Count: 194 Words

THE GREAT BOUDICCA By P.S. Joshi

She stood straight and determined in the chariot, holding the reins in a firm grip, giving forth an air of confidence. It was about A.D. 61. This was the great and powerful Boudicca, woman warrior and leader, Celtic queen of the Iceni tribe, widow of the Celtic king Prasutagus of East Anglia. She was filled with righteous anger, a determination to fight back.

Upon the death of her husband, their kingdom had been unjustly annexed by the Roman Empire under Nero, as if conquered. She had been stripped and beaten, and her daughters raped. Now she was leading her people and the Trinovantes, who joined them, on a revolt, an attack on the Roman-held city of Camulodunum (now Colchester), and capital of Roman Britain. After that, they would drive on to Londinium (now London) and Verulamium (now St. Albans), destroying both cities with a death toll in the thousands.

She was finally defeated by the Roman army led by Paulinus.

It isn’t known for sure whether she was killed, poisoned herself to avoid capture, or died from illness. A statue exists in her memory, while Emperor Nero’s name lives on in infamy

Sunday Photo Fiction Image

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